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One in Three Young Drivers Fear Driving Alone Shortly After Passing Test

New research has revealed that one in three young drivers feel ‘unprepared’ when taking to Britain’s roads shortly after passing their test, Book Theory Test Today understands. A large proportion of young motorists have emphasised that driving lessons fail to fully prepare them for life on the road. According to the research, 29% of young motorists aged 18-30 fear driving solo shortly after obtaining their full driving licence. In addition, 24% of young motorists stated that accidents they had been involved in could have been avoided if they had spent more hours on the road when learning. A further 62% said they would not object to the introduction of a minimum learning period. 2,000 young drivers participated in the research, 21% of those drivers revealed that they avoided motorways shortly after passing their test. 14% declared themselves ‘unprepared’ to take to the roads at all. Furthermore, 29% of poll respondents said they were not ready to drive at night and 21% revealed that driving lessons did not adequately prepare them to transport passengers. 19% of young drivers avoided city centre driving, 14% of drivers refused to drive in adverse weather conditions and 8% of young motorists feared making a right turn, cutting across oncoming traffic. The research revealed that 18% of the 2,000 young drivers surveyed had passed the UK driving test after spending just three months or less as a learner. A further 50% spent six months or less as a learner. Commenting on the research conducted by Co-operative Insurance, Edmund King, the president of the AA said: “It is worrying that so many young drivers feel the driving test does not prepare them adequately for elements of life on the road.” He added: “We would support the idea of allowing learner drivers on to motorways with a trained driving instructor and also a minimum learning period.”


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